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  • Team GH – Evie Toombes Update

    “Evie has had a full on weekend attending the Para Showjumping at Arena UK. It was an incredible experience and every need was catered for. It’s easy for a centre More…

  • New GH Stockist! – Performance Fuels & Feeds

    We are pleased to announce that Performance Fuels & Feeds based in County Fermanagh in Northern Ireland are now stocking a range of Global Herbs supplements! Find them at the More…

  • Team GH – Sarah Gadd Update

    “Just wanted to give you a quick update after we have had a few weeks quiet on the competition front but have been very busy training ready for the season More…

  • Pat and Montana’s Story: PolleneX

    “I wanted to write and congratulate you on your excellent PollenX liquid product. Every year my horse, Montana, has an itchy nose and throat as soon as the pollen season starts. This More…

  • Blue’s Story: Rigcalm

    Thank you very much to Jenny Morgan who sent us in this photo of her six-year-old cob, Blue. Blue is a real character, but his behaviour was a bit unruly. More…

Laminae

Where do the laminae fit in? You can imagine that there is a lot of pressure on a horse’s feet because of the way it stands on ‘tip toe’. One of the ways horses legs are able to cope with this situation is by having sensitive and insensitive laminae layers which fix the toe in position inside the hoof. Microscopically these layers both look like corregated cardboard and fit firmly together to give great strength. The insensitive laminae are part of the hoof wall and sensitive laminae are made up of blood  vessels and nerves which are bound to the soft tissue and the ‘toe bone’ beneath. In this way the bone of the foot is firmly attached to the tough hoof wall.